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The future of work – the student perspective

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Four students involved in the University’s entrepreneurial community participated in a panel discussion recently on attitudes to work. Held at the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship Unleash Space, this was a unique opportunity for HR executives participating in the Executive Education HR Leaders’ Programme to gain valuable insights.

The panellists were:

  • Matt Canham, who is studying Software Engineering, Economics and Finance. He is the student CEO of Velocity.
  • Nina Kim, who is studying Communication. She is the student CEO of Unleash Space.
  • Roman Amor, who is studying Computer Systems Engineering. He is a Lead Creative Technologist at Unleash Space.
  • Anne Pan, who is studying Psychology ad Musicology. She is a Lead Creative Technologist at Unleash Space.

Delving into the “millennial mindset”, the students were asked about their attitudes to work, how they see it evolving in the future, what they would like to gain from their careers, and importantly, what they want to give back to society.

And while their answers differed according to personal circumstances, some common themes emerged from the discussion.

These four students would ideally like to work collaboratively on projects that further the learning, progress and wellbeing of humanity and the environment.

If they were to work for an organisation, they would prefer it had a flat structure, not a hierarchical one, and an innovative mindset. They are drawn to causes more than commerce, but whatever its business, the organisation would need to have an empathetic culture, and know how to engage through social media.

Talking about the future of work: “virtual” working online, while sometimes necessary and convenient, is not their preferred option. There is still the human need for face-to-face interaction with team mates.

Roman commented that it is the project he is working on that is important to him, not the company he’s working for; and none of the four cared much for personal status – preferring internal recognition and celebration of success by colleagues and peers.

And how important is work-life balance? “As long as I’m working on something I’m passionate about, I don’t make a big distinction between work and life”, said Roman. In fact all were happy to work extra hours if they were motivated by and involved in their work. “It’s about people, not money,” said Anne – although they all agreed that money is a nice thing to have!

In summary, for these four a good fit, a purpose or mission, and a focus on continuous growth and improvement are the most important aspects of a job or career.

 

social media

Four students involved in the University’s entrepreneurial community participated in a panel discussion recently on attitudes to work. Held at the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship Unleash Space, this was a unique opportunity for HR executives participating in the Executive Education HR Leaders’ Programme to gain valuable insights.

The panellists were:

  • Matt Canham, who is studying Software Engineering, Economics and Finance. He is the student CEO of Velocity.
  • Nina Kim, who is studying Communication. She is the student CEO of Unleash Space.
  • Roman Amor, who is studying Computer Systems Engineering. He is a Lead Creative Technologist at Unleash Space.
  • Anne Pan, who is studying Psychology ad Musicology. She is a Lead Creative Technologist at Unleash Space.

Delving into the “millennial mindset”, the students were asked about their attitudes to work, how they see it evolving in the future, what they would like to gain from their careers, and importantly, what they want to give back to society.

And while their answers differed according to personal circumstances, some common themes emerged from the discussion.

These four students would ideally like to work collaboratively on projects that further the learning, progress and wellbeing of humanity and the environment.

If they were to work for an organisation, they would prefer it had a flat structure, not a hierarchical one, and an innovative mindset. They are drawn to causes more than commerce, but whatever its business, the organisation would need to have an empathetic culture, and know how to engage through social media.

Talking about the future of work: “virtual” working online, while sometimes necessary and convenient, is not their preferred option. There is still the human need for face-to-face interaction with team mates.

Roman commented that it is the project he is working on that is important to him, not the company he’s working for; and none of the four cared much for personal status – preferring internal recognition and celebration of success by colleagues and peers.

And how important is work-life balance? “As long as I’m working on something I’m passionate about, I don’t make a big distinction between work and life”, said Roman. In fact all were happy to work extra hours if they were motivated by and involved in their work. “It’s about people, not money,” said Anne – although they all agreed that money is a nice thing to have!

In summary, for these four a good fit, a purpose or mission, and a focus on continuous growth and improvement are the most important aspects of a job or career.

 


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