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Emerging Tech Stars of the University of Auckland

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Postgraduate students, researchers and early career academics delivered short presentations that showcased their inventive and innovative use of technology at the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship’s Tech Week event Emerging Tech Stars.

See highlights of the event which amazed and inspired Auckland’s entrepreneurial community in the video below, or the full presentations on YouTube.

Presentations included:

Blood Spatter research – Ravishka Arthur, PhD candidate, Faculty of Science
Bloodstains are a common by-product of violent crime and the analysis of these stains forms a vital part of a crime scene investigation. However, no one method around bloodstain pattern classification claims to be fully validated and widely accepted resulting in qualitative and at times controversial data. Ravishka is working on how pattern recognition and eye tracking technology can be combined to build a novel bloodstain pattern classification system.

The small aspirations of a tiny turkey baster – Ankita Gangotra, PhD candidate and nanotechnologist, Faculty of ScienceResearch in science and technology is becoming increasingly multidisciplinary. The borders between science, engineering and technology are slowly fading. Ankita’s research uses tiny turkey basters to suck up some of the smallest parts of our bodies, to test how squishy or stiff they are. This could be a very early indicator of disease such as cancer. Come along to hear more about Ankita’s adventures in bridging the gap between physics, chemistry and biology.

Sorting sperm cells with lasers – Peter Hosking, PhD candidate, Faculty of Science and Project Manager for Engender Technologies
Engender Technologies, a spin-off company from the University of Auckland’s Photon Factory, is developing a photonic and microfluidic-based solution to sort sperm cells by sex. There currently is a gap in the market for an affordable and effective solution to this problem. Engender exploits minute differences in DNA content between male and female cells to determine sex via fluorescence. Advanced laser technology is used to manipulate and separate sperm cells on a compact and disposable microfluidic chip.

Living light – Hannah Read, research assistant, Bioluminescent Superbugs Lab
Bioluminescence, or “living light”, is the remarkable ability of organisms to glow. It’s the light produced by living creatures, like glow worms, fireflies and even some bacteria. Hannah and her colleagues have been using a safe and naturally glowing bacterium to illuminate people’s understanding of microbes. Using this technology, and their own microbiology expertise, they have developed an educational microbiology kit, allowing people to paint with bacteria and see their living, glowing artwork.

Digital sun protectionDaniel Xu, Co-founder of Spark 64
UV is an invisible radiation from the sun that causes thousands of deaths from skin cancer each year. UVLens aims to educate individuals by providing digital information and tools to teach people about UV and sun safety. UVLens combines a network of sensor stations with forecast algorithms to deliver live UV warnings on a smartphone app and help people balance their sun exposure. Daniel, Co-Founder and CEO of UVLens will describe how UV Lens is developing products to help people live healthier outdoor lives.

 

 

Emerging Tech Stars of the University of Auckland
Emerging Tech Stars of the University of Auckland

social media

Postgraduate students, researchers and early career academics delivered short presentations that showcased their inventive and innovative use of technology at the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship’s Tech Week event Emerging Tech Stars.

See highlights of the event which amazed and inspired Auckland’s entrepreneurial community in the video below, or the full presentations on YouTube.

Presentations included:

Blood Spatter research – Ravishka Arthur, PhD candidate, Faculty of Science
Bloodstains are a common by-product of violent crime and the analysis of these stains forms a vital part of a crime scene investigation. However, no one method around bloodstain pattern classification claims to be fully validated and widely accepted resulting in qualitative and at times controversial data. Ravishka is working on how pattern recognition and eye tracking technology can be combined to build a novel bloodstain pattern classification system.

The small aspirations of a tiny turkey baster – Ankita Gangotra, PhD candidate and nanotechnologist, Faculty of ScienceResearch in science and technology is becoming increasingly multidisciplinary. The borders between science, engineering and technology are slowly fading. Ankita’s research uses tiny turkey basters to suck up some of the smallest parts of our bodies, to test how squishy or stiff they are. This could be a very early indicator of disease such as cancer. Come along to hear more about Ankita’s adventures in bridging the gap between physics, chemistry and biology.

Sorting sperm cells with lasers – Peter Hosking, PhD candidate, Faculty of Science and Project Manager for Engender Technologies
Engender Technologies, a spin-off company from the University of Auckland’s Photon Factory, is developing a photonic and microfluidic-based solution to sort sperm cells by sex. There currently is a gap in the market for an affordable and effective solution to this problem. Engender exploits minute differences in DNA content between male and female cells to determine sex via fluorescence. Advanced laser technology is used to manipulate and separate sperm cells on a compact and disposable microfluidic chip.

Living light – Hannah Read, research assistant, Bioluminescent Superbugs Lab
Bioluminescence, or “living light”, is the remarkable ability of organisms to glow. It’s the light produced by living creatures, like glow worms, fireflies and even some bacteria. Hannah and her colleagues have been using a safe and naturally glowing bacterium to illuminate people’s understanding of microbes. Using this technology, and their own microbiology expertise, they have developed an educational microbiology kit, allowing people to paint with bacteria and see their living, glowing artwork.

Digital sun protectionDaniel Xu, Co-founder of Spark 64
UV is an invisible radiation from the sun that causes thousands of deaths from skin cancer each year. UVLens aims to educate individuals by providing digital information and tools to teach people about UV and sun safety. UVLens combines a network of sensor stations with forecast algorithms to deliver live UV warnings on a smartphone app and help people balance their sun exposure. Daniel, Co-Founder and CEO of UVLens will describe how UV Lens is developing products to help people live healthier outdoor lives.

 

 


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