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Prosthetics student innovators win TechWeek pitch competition

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ON: futures in tech was TechWeek’s biggest event for student entrepreneurs. Three finalists went head-to-head pitching their venture idea on stage in front of a crowd and a panel of global change makers, with the winners awarded a prize pack valued at over $50,000.

This year’s winners were Prosthet-X, comprising of University of Auckland engineering students Connor Talbot (electrical engineering) and Sebastian Weaver (mechanical engineering). Prosthet-X is preparing to produce prosthetic sockets for people who are in pain, suffering discomfort and frustrated at the hard, inflexible socket choices they are currently limited to. The conventional process of creating prosthetics is slow and expensive and does not adequately provide a solution for the ever changing shape and size of residual limbs. Prosthet-X solution incorporates a 3D printing process and recyclable material that is projected to make the process 58% cheaper and 67% faster, whilst addressing the main pain points of amputees.

In developing their pitch they received numerous support from the University of Auckland including mentorship from their academic supervisor Professor Olaf Diegal, UniServices and the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship’s Founders Hatchery. Through incorporating valued feedback and iterating their pitch during practice runs, they were able to demonstrate their capability on the day and win the confidence of the judging panel.  Organiser and General Manager of Niesh, Will Kim, commented that “Team Prosthet-X is using their ingenuity to serve a very common need for pain-free prosthetic joints. Their passion and commitment to their customers was very easy to see.” 

The spectacular prize pack includes $10,000 of seed capital, six months of office space at the B:Hive, legal advice, government relations consultancy, a marketing strategy package, mentoring and more.

The World Health Organisation estimates that there are over 40 million amputees worldwide. It is a lucrative market but Prosthet-X are more concerned with the well-being of the individuals.  Most amputees face issues with socket fits and 75% of all amputees suffer skin condition on the limb, with many suffering from more extreme medical conditions.  Prosthet-X founder Connor Talbot says “Our ambitions are global but here in New Zealand we have a community of around 4,400 amputees with around 500 new referrals each year in a $14 million market. We are starting our prosthetics revolution right here, helping our own amputee community.”

Related reading: Professor Olaf Diegel – A new aesthetic in prosthetics

Prosthetics student innovators win TechWeek pitch competition
Prosthetics student innovators win TechWeek pitch competition

social media

ON: futures in tech was TechWeek’s biggest event for student entrepreneurs. Three finalists went head-to-head pitching their venture idea on stage in front of a crowd and a panel of global change makers, with the winners awarded a prize pack valued at over $50,000.

This year’s winners were Prosthet-X, comprising of University of Auckland engineering students Connor Talbot (electrical engineering) and Sebastian Weaver (mechanical engineering). Prosthet-X is preparing to produce prosthetic sockets for people who are in pain, suffering discomfort and frustrated at the hard, inflexible socket choices they are currently limited to. The conventional process of creating prosthetics is slow and expensive and does not adequately provide a solution for the ever changing shape and size of residual limbs. Prosthet-X solution incorporates a 3D printing process and recyclable material that is projected to make the process 58% cheaper and 67% faster, whilst addressing the main pain points of amputees.

In developing their pitch they received numerous support from the University of Auckland including mentorship from their academic supervisor Professor Olaf Diegal, UniServices and the Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship’s Founders Hatchery. Through incorporating valued feedback and iterating their pitch during practice runs, they were able to demonstrate their capability on the day and win the confidence of the judging panel.  Organiser and General Manager of Niesh, Will Kim, commented that “Team Prosthet-X is using their ingenuity to serve a very common need for pain-free prosthetic joints. Their passion and commitment to their customers was very easy to see.” 

The spectacular prize pack includes $10,000 of seed capital, six months of office space at the B:Hive, legal advice, government relations consultancy, a marketing strategy package, mentoring and more.

The World Health Organisation estimates that there are over 40 million amputees worldwide. It is a lucrative market but Prosthet-X are more concerned with the well-being of the individuals.  Most amputees face issues with socket fits and 75% of all amputees suffer skin condition on the limb, with many suffering from more extreme medical conditions.  Prosthet-X founder Connor Talbot says “Our ambitions are global but here in New Zealand we have a community of around 4,400 amputees with around 500 new referrals each year in a $14 million market. We are starting our prosthetics revolution right here, helping our own amputee community.”

Related reading: Professor Olaf Diegel – A new aesthetic in prosthetics


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